Hundested, Denmark, 1976
Lives and works in Berlin

 

Bio

 

Graduated from the Royal College of Arts, London (2004). She has recently exhibited her work in solo exhibitions at Objectif Exhibitions, Antwerp (2012-16); Standard Oslo, Oslo (2013); Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City (2013); Laura Bartlett Gallery, London (2012); Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen (2011-12); Croy Nielsen, Berlin (2011 & 2014 forthcoming); as well as in group exhibitions at Centre Pompidou, Paris (2013); Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (2013); Museion Bozen, Bolzano (2012); The Artist ́s Institute, New York (2012); KW Institute for Contemporary Art, Berlin (2012); Index, Stockholm (2012); Tate Modern, London (2012); Moca, Miami (2011); Extra City, Antwerp (2011); The Swiss Institute, New York (2011).

Nina Beier

Real Estate, 2013
Headrest, leather, aluminum and marble
Variable dimensions

Real estate is a series of sculptures which employ a circular Sisyphusian logic to address the relationship between production and fatigue. Here headrests from car seats, massage chairs, office chairs and the like have been mounted into blocks of granite. They are manmade shoulders to lean on, rocks, as we find them in a plain metaphorical universe, after all the definition of Real Estate is property that cannot be moved.

Nina Beier
Nina Beier

Flowage, 2013
Tubas, water hoses, water and air,
variable dimensions

Through a series of tubas connected via hoses to the gallery’s plumbing, Beier fixes her sight on the impossibility of an adequate or definitive meaning inhering in what we observe. By associating two objects that appear to be completely alien to each other, the artist inquires on the infinite possibilities which lay in the association of ideas in the face of two concepts that do not seem to fit together.

Nina Beier

Greens (£10), 2013
Printed towel, pressed palm, glass, foam, MDF.
74 x 150.5 x 7 cm
Unique

In the series Greens, the artist has pressed palm-tree-like houseplants placed on beach towels depicting bank notes of various currencies.These pressed plants are representations made of the very material they depict. In these new works Nina Beier, takes the image-like status of these objects literally. Squeezed into two-dimensionality, resting underneath thick sheets of glass, and even arranged to resemble pictorial compositions, the components of her arrangements, while still in limbo, are now finally more image than object, more concept than thing.

 

Nina Beier
Nina Beier

Minutes, 2013
Wagireh rug, real hair wig.

In Minutes, Beier arranges wigs on Wagireh rugs. Originally used to pass on different family styles through generations or as samples for traveling salesmen, these small rugs are compressed summaries of all the patterns of an actual rug. The wigs, pressed against the rugs, are real hair wigs; frozen haircuts from different times, made of hair that will never grow any further.

Nina Beier
Nina Beier

Portrait Mode, 2013
Found garments
125 x 63 cm

Vertically oriented, human-scaled, bulging and overstuffed with the dated discarded apparel, this line of frames play with the space between the animated and the frozen.The work reflects on the relationship between philanthropy and apology, economic and symbolic violence and charity. Returning to the motifs of fur and skin, Beier continues with her interest in the slippery relationship between the carrier and the message, the exterior and the interior, underscoring the diminutive commodification of the exotic into the everyday.

Nina Beier
Nina Beier

The Demonstrators,
Poster from stock image, glue on various objects. Variable dimensions

The Demonstrators apply stock images, printed on poster paper, draped and pasted on objects. As images these are both empty and full as metaphors, remaining deliberately appropriate for a broad variety of contexts and markets. As these fragmented and lifeless images cling desperately to real objects in space, they spring back to life, animated by a new type of juxtaposed (in)coherence. One. On top of the next. InThe Demonstrators, we encounter the familiar culture of the late-capitalist corporate world: generic office furnishings and meeting rooms, images that seem to strive to be as bland and unoriginal as possible so as not to alienate any particular audience. In this respect, Beier creates a new new realism: she reveals and creates subtle shifts in the aesthetic and economic logic that controls the design of the spaces we today inhabit.

Nina Beier
Nina Beier

Cali, Colombia, 1972
Lives and works in Berlin


Bio




The artistic practice of François Bucher (b. 1972 in Cali, Colombia) engages with themes related to the construction of power, history and politics. His works expose an interest in the concept of representation and the relation between the construction of image and language and the reality they refer to. During the artistic process Bucher references science as well as more mystic approaches to the world such as shamanism, thus blurring the line between the ordinarily accepted models of truth and superstition. His interest in representation further questions the particular ethical articulations they give shape to, such as the association between violence and the image of violence.


Formally Bucher focuses mainly on installation, photography and video, exposing a certain interest in the moving image’s passage from cinema to television.

Francois Bucher

The Duration of the Present (Notes on Frequency), 2013
Installation, mixed media; variable dimensions.




The Duration of the Present is the name of one of the multiple experiments in neurophysiology that were realized by Jacobo Grinberg-Zylberbaum, a Mexican scientist from the Universidad Autonoma de Mexico. Grinberg founded and directed, for many years, an avant-garde laboratory in Psychophysiology, a laboratory that was focused on the study of consciousness. The Duration of the Present is an experiment focusing on the tiny yet infinite threshold that we call “the present tense”.

Francois Bucher

Thirteen cast Helmholtz resonators + silkscreen.
Variable dimensions.


The Helmholtz resonators, invented by Hermann Von Helmholtz in the Nineteenth Century were used to analyze the perception of tones, at a physiological level. Each resonator is made to resonate with a specific frequency. The Helmholtz resonator is analogous in its function to the phenomenon called “Schumann Resonance” which describes the frequency of the cavity comprised between the ionosphere and the earth surface. Every earth dweller basically
lives in this frequency.

Francois Bucher
Francois Bucher

The video ends with a statement about the idle state of contemporary man, a being who knows nothing about itself, and who doesn’t even remember how to ask the questions that concern it. As the mountain keeper of Amatlán, Don Aurelio would say: we turn ourselves off (we turn off our vision) as we turn on the TV (the blinding fallacy of artificial tele-vision). Jacobo Grinberg – the man who literally disappeared in 1994– stated that it is to this man of our times that he addresses his own Syntergic Theory. Because it is to him that he offers a possible center, amidst the prevalent dispersion. Through this theory, Grinberg says:
we will be at the very root of the creation of any reality….
The work is nevertheless able to speak about the construction of the image in the sense that Art understands it, and about nature of language. Shamanism is used as a paradigm: the shaman as a being of coherence.

And this coherence translates as a being in touch with a Language that produces, transforms, ACTS on the world, in the multi-sphere of what we have, until now, called the sacred. Language in a convex form, rather than concave (referential); a geometric construction, a crystal which plays upon meaning in a pluri-vocal resonance, a power generator, a materializer and a de-materializer of the real.



The man who disappeared, 2011
Single channel HD video
20 min.

Francois Bucher

The second and a half dimension, 2010
Installation; Mixed media in variable dimensions

Francois Bucher
Francois Bucher

Chronique d’un film, 2011
Black and white video, sound
In collaboration with Ayreen Anastas and René Cabri


Chronique d’un film, is based on the film Chronique d’un Été, by Jean Rouch and Edgar Morin. The project revisits the revolutionary ethos of the 1960´s, intended, as a collective project remained unfinished. The artists dedicated themselves to analyze the film by Rouch and Morin and decided to recover the rushes of the film, make new editing and redeem the missed opportunity.

Francois Bucher
Francois Bucher




“A woman survives a clinical death in 1988 and wakes up hearing voices in her head. Samuel, a spirit, has started to speak through her. People identify her as a medium. Samuel proclaims a mission to save the world before the year 2012. The entity’s name soon changes from Samuel to EN KI, a Sumerian God who claims to be the father of the human race. that has already begun.
The mission is under way: to dig up the mummy of Cheops, the builder of the Great Pyramid, and to find a man in a holy mountain in Peru, Severiano Olivares, who needs to remember something, from a former incarnation, about the construction of the Pyramid in Egypt. All this must be accomplished in time to save humanity from a recurring cycle of destruction There is another way to tell the story.







A man, excited by his spiritual awakening – following a shamanic ceremony in Colombia – decides to portray a mysterious story involving a certain group in Poland: a so-called mission to save the earth. He is keen on erring on the side of doubt at every step of his adventures within a newly discovered esoteric world. But doubt and belief are the very issues at play, feedback being the real name of the game that he has become involved in.”
-François Bucher




La nuit de l’homme, 2008-2011
Single Channel video
1’44”


Francois Bucher
Francois Bucher

Onda Corta (Short Wave), 2007
Black and white photographs and
35 mm slide installation with audio


Large format photographs and a slide installation with audio from a series shot in the ruins of one of the many mansions of Gonzalo Rodríguez Gacha, alias “El Mexicano” — the second man in command in the Medellín Cartel of the 1980’s. The photographs are staged pictures, where a 9 year-old boy acts as a sort of DJ of recent Colombian history, mixing images and sounds from different sources (which are used in the soundtrack of the slide installation). Some of the pictures show stranded paper boats made from Colombian newspapers and magazines, where a long history of violence may be perceived obliquely.

Francois Bucher
Francois Bucher

Severa Vigilancia (Haute Surveillance), 2007
HD Color video + Sound (Spanish with English subtitles)
36’00


This project develops from a real event that took place during a theatre seminar in the masters degree program at the Universidad de Antioquia in Medellin, Colombia. The seminar occurred during one of university’s worst periods of violence. Two students in charge of a presentation about the life and work of French author Jean Genet decided to play a joke on their fellow students a joke that involved an armed kidnapping. Their idea was to perform the ethos of Genets work rather than to represent it in a conventional way.

Francois Bucher

The picture of Fox Hunting in the Bogotá Savannah, 2007


Installation (50 photographs of different sizes, 2 tables, 1 cup of tea and photographic material from where the pictures were found.

Francois Bucher

About a Date in the Past Brought Forward by a Date in the Future, 2005
Lambda print on aluminium. 80 x 100 cm


A banner with the last photograph of Salvador Allende alive is placed in Ground Zero, New York. The eyes of Allende meet the warplanes that are approaching to bombard the presidential palace of La Moneda, in the entrance of which he stands.The date is September 11th, 1973; in a US-backed military coup, General Augusto Pinochet takes power in Chile and begins his long lasting dictatorship. The eyes of Allende also meet, in a virtual vacuum with the path of two other planes, that 28 years later inaugurate yet another period of ruins.

Francois Bucher

White Balance (Thinking is Forgetting Differences), 2002. Color video + Sound. 32’00

White Balance (thinking is forgetting differences) is an effort to uncover the geographies of power, the frontiers of privilege. It revisits this problem from different angles, creating meaning short circuits, which are hosted by improbable audiovisual matches. Media and Internet footage is intermixed with images shot in downtown Manhattan before and after the September 11th attacks. The video presents a question that needs to be visited over and over, a question that is always there and is larger than us. Yvonne Rainer asked this question in her film Privilege: is a permanent recovering racist the most we can ever be? In this sense, by offering a Meta narrative that pretends to describe the issues at stake is a failure to understand the layers of unspeakability that are hidden in the question of whiteness. The video opts for a poetic language, a way that seeks to stimulate thought, by concentrating on the openings of the audiovisual experience, in a short-lived moment between images and words.

Francois Bucher

San Luis Potosí, México, 1976
Lives and works in Mexico City

 

Bio

 

 

José León Cerrillo was born in San Luis Potosí, Mexico in 1976 and graduated from Colombia University, New York in 2003. His work focuses on various aspects of modernity and its legacy in contemporary art. The sculptural objects and installations become starting points of a discussion of the structures that form the perception of the viewing subjects that interact with them, whereas a different group of works with strong references to graphic design, touch upon the theme of communication and the diffusion and reception of information. Seen in this light Cerrillo’s abstract works can be read as alternative systems of representation and investigations of the relationship between object and subject.

Jose Leon Cerrillo

Thirteen pop songs stemming from philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein make up the core of artists José León Cerrillo and Saralunden´s collaborative musical performance. The lyrics are based on elements of Wittgenstein´s book Bemerkungen über die Farben (Remarks on Color) and were written between 2009/2011. In tandem with Wittgenstein’s theoretical investigations on the ways one can speak about Color and Transparency, the performance series is constructed around shadows and projections. The first installment of the series was performed as part of and within the context of JLC´s exhibition Hotel Edén 2009 in Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City. Saralunden sang projected as a shadow on a paper screen amidst several sculptural structures that doubled as shadow props. The inevitable platonic wink was made manifest in the second iteration of Wittgenstein Suite, performed as part of Cerrillo’s residency as exhibition in the Schindler house in Los Angeles 2010 under the title ¨Schindler´s Window/ Plato’s Cave”. The final installment was performed in 2012 in Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm as part of Abstract Possible, Maria Lind’s curatorial investigation on the current modes of abstraction.

Hotel Edén, 2009
Installation.
Proyectos Monclova, 2009

Jose Leon Cerrillo

Hotel Edén, 2009
Wittgenstein Songs
Performance en colaboración
con Saralundén
Proyectos Monclova, 2009

Jose Leon Cerrillo

Hotel Eden Revisted, 2012
Installation.
as a part of Abstract Possible
at Tensta Konsthall, Stockholm.

Jose Leon Cerrillo

Schindler’s Window, Plato’s Cave, 2011
Installation, performance.
Schindler’s House, Los Angeles, 2011.

Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo

The Wittgenstein Suite, 2012
In collboration with Saralunden
Installation, performance
Proyectos Monclova, Feb. – March 2012

Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo

Unstable Example (01), 2013
96 x 76 cm; Hierro, esmalte

Unstable Example (03), 2013
96 x 76 cm; Steel, enamel.

Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo

Double Agent (01), 2009
Iron, automotive lacquer, reflective glass
110 x 70 c/cara

Double Agent (02), 2009
Iron, automotive lacquer, reflective glass
110 x 70 c/cara

Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo

The New Psychology, 2010
Steel, electrostatic paint.

These artworks, rather than thought of as sculpture, are intended as structures, both in the architectural and the philosophical sense. The sculpture frames an empty space, the analogy of a possible structure of language-meaning: form and content, word and significance, because the empty frame is a negotiation with the possibility of understanding it as something flat, as a totality. It is from this negotiating that a structure is built. The sculptures interrupt the act of representation-meaning, highlighting the problems implied and the need of interpretation. The framed gap should be seen as flat to make the sculpture-structure work.

Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo

Hotel Edén, 2009
Steel, silkscreen on acetate.
Variable dimensions.

Untitled, 2008
Silkscreen on acetate, wooden frame.
Variable dimensions

Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo

Untitled, 2008
Silkscreen on acetate.
50.8 x 60.9 cm

Jose Leon Cerrillo

From the series: de and perse and, 2007
Silkscreen on wood
91 x 71 x 4 cm c/u

Installation view of Futuro Anterior, OMR gallery, Mexico City, 2007

Futuro Anterior, 2007

Jose Leon Cerrillo
Jose Leon Cerrillo





London, UK, 1982
Lives and works in Berlin


Bio


Born in 1982 (London, UK) Simon Fujiwara has created a complex and rich body of interconnecting works that encompass performance, film, installations, sculptures and texts. Bringing personal experiences both real and imagined into contact with larger historical events, his expansive practise has been described as an ‘autobiographical journey through the architecture of modern life – constantly rebuilt as it is retold’. His exhibitions and projects often function as invisible structures in which players – family members, real-life friends, historic figures – and events past and the future cohabit and interact generating scenarios in which the real and the imagined are no longer distinguishable. Often appearing himself within his works and shifting into various guises, Fujiwara’s personal narratives form an unstable core from which the world is observed and re-performed, confronting us with our notions of truth, authenticity, morality and the credibility of the artist as narrator.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara

Studio Pietà (King Kong Komplex), 2013
Video 20:30 min.
Mixed media installation
Dimensions variable


Studio Pietà (King Kong Komplex) tells the story of Simon Fujiwara’s attempt to restage and photograph a lost picture of his mother held in the arms of a Lebanese boyfriend. The photo was taken on a beach close to the Casino du Liban, where she worked as a cabaret dancer in the late 1960s. In what starts as a seemingly simple reconstruction, Fujiwara begins to understand his role as director, and the unwanted powers he holds. In the process of casting the models, designing the set and even selecting the makeup, he is drawn into a labyrinth of larger social and political questions to which he has no answers.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara


Letters from Mexico, 2011
Installation; variable dimensions



The title of this installation echoes the Letters from Mexico published by Hernán Cortés, the Spanish ‘conquistador’ commanding the expedition that overthrew the Aztec empire in 1521, in modern-day central Mexico. Cortés wrote his personal account of this conquest in five missives sent to the Spanish King, Charles I, who by then had become Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. Like Cortés, Fujiwara is a European who travelled across Mexico and, also like Cortés, he recounts his experiences in a series of eight dispatches.

Fujiwara’s letters from Mexico reveal his initial enthusiasm for the local culture, from the appealing architecture to the rich flavours of the food. However, they also demonstrate his later disenchantment with the country’s social inequality, of which the most evident manifestation is conspicuous violence.
Fujiwara’s texts were typed in the Plaza Santo Domingo, an area in Mexico City’s historic quarter known for its scribes. These street typists assist illiterate people by transcribing any piece of writing, from official documents personal accounts. Fujiwara dictated his texts to a group of them over a number of weeks in the winter of 2010–11. As they didn’t understand English, the scribes typed his words phonetically. Lost in translation, these communications appear to symbolize the ongoing misunderstanding between Europeans and Mexicans.

Simon Fujiwara

Fujiwara has framed each of the transcribed texts and shows them alongside memorabilia of his journey. The first includes a Lufthansa air ticket and a toy metal sword inside a vintage edition of Cortés’s Letters from Mexico, as well as a photograph of a Plaza de Santo Domingo tile sign. Fujiwara also shipped Mexican items to Europe, including a replica skull of a ‘conquistador’, a sombrero and a revolutionary scythe. Resembling a cabinet of curiosities, the display recreates the atmosphere of an anthropological museum. Mexico simultaneously celebrated the bicentenary of its independence and the centenary of its revolution in 2010. Fujiwara evokes the colonial relationship between Spain and Mexico by addressing most of his messages to ‘Europe’, and alludes to Mexican nationalism by surrounding the display with curtains in the green, red and white of the Mexican flag. The last of his letters from Mexico, as the artist makes clear in the information panel he includes as part of the installation, describes his ‘fictionalized death at the hands of a merciless story that he, himself, has written’.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara

Hasta la vista, Maybe, 2011
Letterbox, letter
25 x 7 x 1 cm

Simon Fujiwara

Gifts (Returned), 2011
Skull, book, magnifying glass, rifle and two cardboard boxes


As a part of his work Lettes from Mexico, Fujiwara makes an installation compounded
by a skull, a dictionary, a magnifying glass and a rifle. The work is titles Gifts (Returned) given that it hints at the intention of sending back to Europe these presents that where brought by the Spanish when they conquered the territory.
The skull is a reproduction of the only skull ever found of a Spaniard killed by an axe, while the dictionary symbolizes the language and the rifle, war. All of these objects, along with some letters addressed to Europe, are gifts that would be sent back to the Old Continent.

Simon Fujiwara

Rehearsal for a Reunion (With the Father of Pottery), 2011
HD video, color, sound
14’25”


At the age of 28, British/Japanese artist Simon Fujiwara journeyed to his childhood hometown of Shizuoka, Japan to reunite with his father after over twenty years of separation. With the intention of producing a lasting symbol of their reunion, the father and son duo embarked on a pottery course to produce a replica tea set based on the work of Bernard Leach, the master potter whose work came to define a perfect union of Eastern and Western aesthetic ideologies. Inspired by the biography of Leach and his status as ‘The Father of British Studio Pottery’, father and son Fujiwara’s own tea set was to become the ideal, symbolic prop in their own tea ceremony which was, in turn, to be the opportunity for them to bridge the psychological and geographical gulfs of their relationship.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara

Desk Job, 2009
Desk, unfinished novel, images collage.


The work was created as the ‘home office’ area of the fictional collector who resided in the home created in the Nordic Pavilion.
The project was a co-dependent text and sculptural work that explored two ideas: fiction as a mirror of real life, and the conflict of work and sex – the age-old internal battle of savage man versus the cultured man. The writer who works at the desk is caught in this conflict, slowly growing mad as he tries to write an auto- biographical erotic novel.



The narrative becomes circular and convoluted when the writer resolves to write the novel about trying to write the erotic novel – describing his descent into madness, his filthy erotic obsessions with ‘clean’ modernist architecture and the breakdown of contemporary man as life and fiction blur. The writing desk (that the unfinished novel is presented on) is a miniature replica of the Nordic Pavilion building, giving a visible sculptural presence to the mirroring and repetition that occurs within the text.
The desk showed a synopsis of the unfinished novel that could be taken away by the viewer, a collage of images from the writer’s archive were laid out as a storyboard and personal items that may give a clue to the identity of the character.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara

Welcome to the Hotel Munber, 2008 – on going
Readings


Welcome to the Hotel Munber is an on-going series of readings that retell Fujiwara’s parents’ life history as erotic fiction. Running a hotel and bar in the last years of the Franco dictatorship, their anecdotes of oppression and violence set against, flamenco and the beginning of mass tourism in Spain are used as the material for homoerotic tales. Inspired by the fact that Franco censored all pornography and gay activity, the stories seek to tell a lost, impossible history of a nation under oppression.

Simon Fujiwara

The readings describe the conflict of needing to tell this untold erotic political history whilst having to use a personal family history to write the book. It involves explicit extracts from the erotic novel, originally published in porn magazines, as well as themes and intentions for the novel that range from the political to the absurd. Eggs and omelettes, fascist soldiers’ uniforms, Spanish architecture, Franco’s single testicle and early tourism in Spain all play their part.
Welcome to the Hotel Munber has been performed and exhibited at Neue Alte Brücke, Frankfurt/Main, Göteborg Konsthall, Pinchuk Art- Centre, Kiev and Art Basel where it was award the Baloise Art Prize.
Extracts from the Welcome to the Hotel Munber are published in Straight to Hell: The Manhattan Re- view of Unnatural Acts.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara

The Mirror Stage, 2009
Play; re-stage of the artist’s first encounter with a modern artwork


The Mirror Stage is an autobiographical play written and performed by the artist that re-stages his first encounter with a modern artwork, an event that ultimately led him to become an artist himself. In 1993, when he was 11 years old, the Tate St Ives was constructed on the beach in Fujiwara’s seaside hometown, and showed the Horizontal Stripe Painting by the abstract expressionist Patrick Heron.

Within a newly designed theatre also situated on the beach – in Miami – Fujiwara’s play re-enacts multiple versions of this first encounter, and features a counterfeit reproduction of the original canvas as a backdrop. Taking us on an increasingly absurd personal journey, the play passes from the myths and clichés of artists child- hoods, through the sexual psychology of abstract painters, to the history of post-war British art, all told through the memories of a repressed pubes- cent boy with the aid of 11 year old actor, Keanu, standing in as a double for the artist.
The Mirror Stage has been performed at Art Basel Miami Beach as part of Art Perform curated by Jens Hoffmann.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara

The Museum of Incest, 2008
Tour, murals, slides, presentation, artefacts




The Museum of Incest (performance) is a guided tour through a fictional museum building that represents an alternative history of the ‘origin of man’ seen through incestuous practices. Inspired by an expedition to the ‘Cradle of Mankind’ – the archaeological site in East Africa where the remains of the first man were discovered – the museum is designed from a collage of buildings that Fujiwara’s father has realized in Japan. Bringing a personal family story into the incest narrative scheme.

The tour is accompanied with slides, mural (painted by Fujiwara’s father) and artifacts from the African site. Part university lecture, part archaeological treatise, part family confessional, the museum explores one of the last taboos in Western society as material for a speculative visitors attraction proposed to sit, symbolically, on the graves of first man.
The work has a range of manifestations from lectures in universities, to performances within specifically constructed installations. The Museum of Incest Guide Book was published in 2009 and provides information on the founding story of the building including detailed architectural representations, maps and descriptions of the museum’s collection.
The Museum of Incest has been performed, and or installed, at OTIS, Los Angeles, Royal College of Art, London, Frieze Art Fair, London, MUSAC, Leon and Kunsthaus Bregenz.

Simon Fujiwara

The Personal Effects of Theo Grünberg, 2010
Theo Grünberg’s personal effects; books, poetry diaries, vinyl records, newspaper cuttings and postcards; Journey.




When Theo Grünberg: academic, explorer, Nazi prisoner and eroticist died in Berlin in the winter of 2008, he was 136 years old. The personal effects he left behind included a library of almost 1,000 books, poetry diaries, vinyl records, newspaper cuttings and postcards that Fujiwara inherited from Grünberg’s grandson. Shortly after, Fujiwara embarked on a journey to piece together the life of the impossibly ancient man through the story

his library told, but was quickly led into a maze of mirrors, dead ends, and deception.
Telling the personal story of his search, Fujiwara presents a performance set within the library of Theo Grünberg that details a quest that consumed him for almost two years and brought him some 10,000 kilometres around the world, from Berlin’s “Stasi” headquarters to the deep Amazonian jungle in Brazil. As Grünberg’s life story becomes increasingly entwined with history of modern Germany, Fujiwara in turn finds himself suffocatingly possessed by a man that he no longer recognizes as his own invention – until one day he discovers that Theodor Grünberg, the 20th Century Man, may not even be dead.
The Personal Effects of Theo Grünberg has been performed and exhibited at Julia Stoschek Collection, Düsseldorf and 29th Sao Paulo Biennial.

Simon Fujiwara

Feminine Endings, 2009
Video; performance and installation. In collaboration with Tim Davies


Feminine Endings is the first of a series of collaborations between Tim Davies and Simon Fujiwara. The two artists met whilst studying together in Germany and subsequently discovered that they had both played cello from a young age and had both been taught by strong, matriarchal teachers. This shared piece of biographical trivia and the fact of the cello’s long association in the visual arts with the female form, provided the artists an opportunity to investigate the representation of women by men and to explore their own relation to this history.









The video that forms the backdrop to their performance is comprised of hundreds of still images overlaid one on top of the other. These images were shot over a period of a few days in Berlin, in museums, galleries, shop- ping malls and on the street. They all depict or in some way represent the female form. The images are divided into three sequences, referring to antiquity, romantic painting and contemporary art. These sequences are ordered according to a temporal parabola that traces the representation of women from birth to death. On the opening night the artists accompany the video with a live cello performance of three separate pieces of music corresponding to the visual sequences on screen.
Feminine Endings has been performed and installed at Temporare Kunsthalle, Berlin, Museo Marino Marini, Florence and Göteborgs Konsthall.

Simon Fujiwara

Art Worlds: Mex in the City, 2013
Video, 21’30


In the second of a series of absurdist interviews with a fictional stand-in of the artist Simon Fujiwara, television host Phineas Pett travels to Mexico City to visit the artist where he currently lives and works to discover a new and exciting side to the city. Filmed entirely on location in Berlin the TV show becomes a parody of the current travel-entertainment-arts culture by showing an apparently “unique artists’ perspective” of a city that does not exist. Visiting both landmark historical sites and the artists’ favourite places to eat, drink and shop, the television show is designed to be a snappy city guide to the discerning tourist as well as portrait of the artist in his natural habitat.

Simon Fujiwara
Simon Fujiwara

Monclova, Mexico, 1975
Lives and works in Mexico City


Bio








Mario García Torres (b. 1975, Coahuila, Mexico) graduated from California Institute of the Arts in 2005. He currently lives and works in Mexico City.
García Torres draws inspiration from the history of conceptual art, often unlocking many of its narratives and re-actualizing them in new contexts. His often nostalgic take on history brings forth new ideas, meanings and perspectives on the topics in question. Through medias such as film, installation, slide projection and performative interventions Mario García Torres reanimates tradition in a critical and sensual, yet playful way.

Mario Garcia Torres

Tea (1391), 2011
35 mm film transfered to 64′ video
Commissioned by dOCUMENTA (13)


Tea is an essay film documenting an artistic gesture surrounding Alighiero Boetti’s One Hotel in Kabul, Afghanistan. What does it mean to return to a place while visiting it for the first time? How a guest can become a host due to a years-late arrival? How far, really, is Afghanistan from Mexico? These questions, as they pertain to the relationship between Boetti and Mario Garcia Torres, are considered in the film.

Mario Garcia Torres

Kunsthalle Basel 1976-1982, 2012
Paper and glue on linen
70 x 100 cm
Unique


Kunsthalle Zurich 1979-1991, 2013
Paper and glue on linen
84 x 59 cm


In his practice, Mario Garcia Torres has excelled in searching for moments and situations not officially registered in the recent history of art, from the era of the sixties through the so- called conceptual art. In this series of décollages, the artists nullifies one after another bringing together posters of exhibitions in a specific period of a museum, to then “dig” into them and thereby generate a new image without having absolute control on the final result of the work.

Mario Garcia Torres
Mario Garcia Torres

Guhleh Muhlat Baa Styleh Mueh Alighiero Boetti, Kabul
(Shot of Grace with Alighiero Boetti Hairstyle, Kabul),
2011
25 b&w slides


This twenty five black and white slides capture García Torres in the act of running down a street, away from the camera, as if fleeing the visual field. Beyond the title, clear references to Boetti are nowhere to be found—the haircut, itself a tenuous connection at best, is little in evidence, since we only see the artist from the back, and even that at some distance.
The artist once stated, I realized that there was this somewhat foolish connection to Boetti: a similar haircut, which made me think of identifying myself with the Italian artist in an arbitrary way in the piece. In the long series of slides where I am repeatedly seen running away from the camera but being caught by it in every shot, it’s almost as if I am refusing to accept something I realized later, which is that an artist’s persona is going to be present in his or her work no matter what.

What Happens in Halifax Stays in Halifax
(1969 NSCAD’s Project Class reunion. Oct 11-13),

2004-2006
50 b&w slides


Mario García Torres’s work What Happens in Halifax Stays in Halifax, (2004–2006) began with a process of historical research. García Torres became intrigued by obscure references to a “project class” that the artist Robert Barry enacted in 1969 at the invitation of David Askevold, a professor at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. For the class, Barry was asked to instruct the student artists toward the realization of a conceptual project as a group.

His instructions to the students were simple—to agree on an idea that needed to remain a secret in order to remain a work of art. García Torres’s research was an attempt to discover whether the work of art still existed on its own terms. He could only inquire about the work’s existence, not its nature, so as not to kill the secret, which, in the artist’s words, “set up some sort of research limitations that only allowed me to deal with abstract thoughts, stories, and mysteries. I felt like it was a real detective task.” He eventually initiated a reunion of the former students in the location where the piece was initially enacted.

My Westphalia Days, 2008.
16 mm film
15’00


My Westphalia Days is a short film based on a few lost days in the history of an icon of contemporary sculpture. The Conceptual artist Michael Asher has presented, as an artwork, a commonplace caravan at Sculpture Project Munster since its inception in 1977. On 21 July 2007, the caravan disappeared, only to be discovered four days later at the edge of a forest in the outskirts of the city. Garcia Torres has proposed a fiction about these missing days, filming a 30-year-old Mercedes Benz stealing a caravan almost identical to the one used by Asher from the site where it disappeared. The result is an open-ended, fragmentary road movie that follows the meandering path of the caravan as the car pulls it through busy streets, open autobahns and quiet, rural roads before it is abandoned amidst the forests and farmlands of Westphalia

Moonwalk (Rigo Style), 2006
37 b&w slides
Variable dimensions


It is a little known fact that decades before Michael Jackson did the popular moonwalk in 1983, dancers, mimes and singers of different styles and geographies performed the famous dance step. There is some documentation that records surprising versions of such technique, also known as slide dance or buzz, as far as the 1930´s.
The works produced by Mario García Torres about this particular theme seek to vindicate a revealing and so far omitted fact in this genealogy: the popular songwriter Rigo Tovar (1946-2005) also danced a rudimentary version of the moonwalk tuned to cumbia music back in the early seventies.

Today, (News from Kabul), 2006
Grafite on wall


Today (Latest News From Kabul) is a wall piece made by the artist after Alighiero Boetti where instead of the date the piece was made, the beginning of the latest news from that city is written with right and left hands simultaneously. Each time the piece is installed it will be composed of a different text depending of the current situation there. A dark mobile with a long title is seen as a take on modern thinking and the way this has influenced in different times the westernisation of life in Kabul.

Göttingen, Germany, 1968
Works and lives in Berlin


Bio






Christian Jankowski was educated at the Academy of Fine Arts, Hamburg, Germany.
Jankowski’s conceptual and performative art practice is mainly collaborative. The artist often engages unsuspecting collaborators to participate in the artistic process – thus transforming them into unconscious co-authors of the final work. The process becomes an important part of the work, as the risks and chances inherent in his collaborations ultimately give surprising shape to the final work. Being the product of a generation that grew up with the ubiquity of film and television, the essentially populist nature of media esthetics is evident throughout Jankowski’s work.

Christian Jankowski

Orientación (Orientation), 2012
Video, b/w, sound.
Spanish with English subtitles
8:25 min




Orientación was realized on the occasion of the 1st Montevideo Biennial, El Gran Sur. For this event, Jankowski invited volunteers and press to gather in Plaza de los Inmigrantes, where he then blindfolded himself along with willing participants. He asked the journalists in attendance – both local and international – to safely guide the blindfolded group to the top of Montevideo mountain. The journalists performed a dual function, acting in their own roles, as well as the role of assisting the handicapped. Once the group reached the top, Jankowski asked those blindfolded to orientate themselves towards the east. The participants stayed in this position in quiet contemplation for ten minutes and then were lead back to their starting point at the bottom of the mountain.

Christian Jankowski

Monumento a la clase burguesa trabajadora
(Monument for the Bourgeois Working Class),
2012
Cardboard, MDF and polyurethane foam


Monumento a la clase burguesa trabajadora is a monument once installed in the indoor yard of the Sala de Arte Público Siqueiros: a great scale artwork inspired by a picture of Siqueiros, that reflects the contradictions between the lifestyle of the Mexican artist, his political convictions and his social position as an active member of the Mexican political Left in the 20th Century. A series of photographs under the title of
Estudio para un monumento a la
clase burguesa trabajadora
(Study for a Monument for
the Bourgeois Working Class)

complements the monument given that it was produced with the participation of every worker in the institution and the external collaborators of the exhibition. Everyone involved hold the picture taken by Siqueiros, that depicts a woman’s hand elegantly holding a bit. This series intents to portray a testimony of the collective effort implied in producing an art show.

Christian Jankowski
Christian Jankowski

Casting Jesus, 2011
Set of 20 framed works
Each: 2 C-Prints, 10 x 15 cm


Intrigued by how the Catholic Church canon relates to the image of Jesus, Jankowski decided to realize a cast of Jesus with the help of a jury formed by people of the Vatican. Related to this project, four works were presented in Mexico City: A series of framed photographs from the cast of Jesus. Each frame has a picture of the jury and a picture of one Jesus, and a phrase related to the context of the representation.

Christian Jankowski

As a part of the whole project, Jesus arrived in Mexico City in April 2011 to realize a series of apparitions in different contexts of Mexican life, from living with a family to appearing in a national soap opera.
Waiting for Him to Appear in a Telenovela (2011) is the appearance of Jesus in the background of a scene in a soap opera called “El privilegio de amar”.
In April 1, a newspaper add was published in “El Universal”. The add was an invitation for Mexican families to live with Jesus for one day. Viva con Jesus (2011), is a progress piece that was taking place for the duration of his stay in Mexico. With different backgrounds, such as hotels and apartments, Jesus coexisted with the people of the Mexico City.

Christian Jankowski

What still needs to be
done (Get flight tickets for Jesus),

2011
Neon
Variable Dimensions


Finally What Stills to be Done (2011) was a list with the things that had to be done for the arrival of Jesus, in this case the command Set flight tickets for Jesus is presented in neon lights. What Still Needs to be Done is a project inspired by the memoranda that the artist writes, which includes questions he must ask his gallerist, his assistant, his students and even his accountant. The lists pile up, multiply on his desk, turn into some kind of newspaper of personal, chaotic, sometimes humorous notes that divert him from the artistic work he should concentrate on. Although, this notes gave him the idea of being used as a support for another project.

Christian Jankowski
Christian Jankowski

Tableau Vivant TV, 2011
Video
Ed. 5/5 + 2AP


The video -made for the Biennale of Sydney- consists of TV Journalists reporting on the production of an artwork which will become the artwork itself; ‘reporting’ live from the inside of art production. The journalists will find different theater-like settings, staged in the style of a tableau vivant with “frozen” artists, actors and people that work for the biennale. The TV-journalists are requested to inform the public about the situations they are facing, in the style of a reporter reporting live from the site of action.

Christian Jankowski

Cleaning up the studio, 2010 (overview)
Digital Print
Diptych, 101.5 x 125.5 cm each


Jankowski travels to Korea at the invitation of the Nam June Paik Museum, where he sees Nam June Paik’s studio for the first time. Shortly before he died, Paik had sold his untidy studio as an installation. After his death, the entire studio was shipped back from New York to Seoul and reconstructed in the museum. Jankowski decides to clean up the chaos and to do that, he hires a professional cleaning firm which promises to put everything in order.

Christian Jankowski

Strip the Auctioneer, 2009
Installation of ten framed photographs
HD video, 25 min.


The auctioneer Amo Verkade incorporates himself at an auction in Christie’s auction house Amsterdam. Verkade bids his garment piece by piece down to his hammer. He strips himself of his suit, transforming those pieces of clothing into objects of desire. In this piece, Jankowski questions the relationship between the economic and the symbolic value of art.

Christian Jankowski
Christian Jankowski



Copenhagen, Denmark, 1976
Lives and works in London


Bio






Marie Lund graduated from the Royal College of Art, London in 2004.
Marie Lund’s poetic works are formed as conceptual investigations of objects, forms and materials, often focused on the interaction between the human body and the object as well as the relation between surface and content, abstraction and its reference to a specific reality. Her sculptural objects frequently place themselves in a limbo between image and solid object and the notion of medium often flickers in a complex alternation between painting, photography and sculpture. Thus rethinking not only the idea of the object, but also the space and the experience that surrounds it.

Marie Lund

Handstand, 2013
Installation view, Imo-projects, Copenhagen 2013

Marie Lund

Level, 2012
Marble, wool.
82 x 52 x 20 cm


For this sculpture, Marie Lund thought of softness and hardness; about the weight and the dimensions of materials, which although before flat, once folded, they become objects.

Marie Lund

The Very White Marbles, 2013
Carved wooden figure
40 x 22 x 22 cm.


The Very White Marbles (3), 2013
Carved found marble sculpture
30 x 21 x 18
Unique


The sculptures that recall heads had been chiseled from found and weathered sculptures until arriving at yet untouched layers of the material. They have lost ears and nose and are left completely bare, both pointing to the material and the person there once were.

Marie Lund
Marie Lund

Beginning Happening (Fig. 11), 2013
Onix, glass jar
50 x 62 x 50 cm (aprox.)


Beginning Happening (Fig. 7), 2013
Soapstone, handlebar
48 x 38 x 25 cm


Beginning Happening (Fig. 5), 2013
Travertine, archival compact disc
23 x 87 x 33 cm

Marie Lund

These rocks in the rough are put together with everyday objects that seem like they were chosen by some kind of assonance with the qualities of the stone. The composition is based in the geological documentation of the rocks, where the object’s function as a measure to identify its scale.
Lund is interested in the notion of scale and the initial relationship between a material in the raw and the wish to relate with and configure it. The series of works Beginning Happening, represents a potential sculpture, giving place to the first steps of something figurative taking shape.
The selected objects are like different extensions of the body –tools that connect us with a specific object through its function: like a shoehorn or a glass of wine; and relates it with the stones as a kind of measuring tool that describes something figurative. The places where the objects are placed are carved and polished, giving the impression of having been there for many years, embedded like fossils.

Marie Lund
Marie Lund

Settings, 2012
Silk fabric, aluminium frame (255x105cm), found ladder


Settings is a series that exposes stretched screens of silk on metallic frames. Like the series Stills their appearance bears reference to painting. The fragile material is exposed on different objects such as a ladder, a coat hanger and a pile of chairs. All objects that in different ways relate themselves to the space they are exhibited in. The exposed silk screens thus become transformers, converting the objects into images and at the same time adding spacial volume to the images.

Marie Lund
Marie Lund

Clickety Click, 2012
Aluminium suitcase, carved wooden figure.
55 x 40 x 20 cm


Clickety Click consists of a wooden portrait bust whose facial traits have been chiselled away. The bust is located on top of a silver suitcase, as if it were about to be packed away. The bust is part of the series The Very White Marbles, which is made from found sculptures of unknown persons, whose facial traits the artist thereafter removed. The series plays on themes such as the relationship between material and representation as well as content and surface. The metal suitcase underlines the notion of the removal of the sculpture from its initial context and points at the possible contents and destinations the sculpture and/or material faces.

Marie Lund

Beginning Happening, (Fig. 8), 2011
Volcanic rock, aluminum ladder.
180 x 140 x 80 cm.


Two Ways to Fall, 2011
Variable dimensions.
Organic material, string, metal.


Two Ways to Fall, 2011
Solo exhibition by Marie Lund
Proyectos Monclova

Marie Lund
Marie Lund

Mexico City, Mexico, 1979
Lives and works in Mexico City

Bio

TPCEN

Talking to a person within a group of people, 2015,
White marble, cosmetic contact lenses with personalised prescriptions (colors: sapphire, blue, honey, grey, green and puro hazel), six friends within a group of people wearing contact lenses different color that their own eyes.
3 x 53.7 x 35 cm

TPCEN

A person possessed by curiosity,2015
Wood-fired clay,
Banamex bank account.
60 cm diameter x 22 cm depth

TPCEN
TPCEN

Between March twenty-sixth and May ninth, 2015
Exhibition view
Proyectos Monclova, Mexico City.

TPCEN

They say it makes miracles, 2015,
Glass from a window facing north, plastic bag
13 x 45 x 25.5 cm

TPCEN

They say it happens for a reason, 2015
Glass from a window facing south, acoustic guitar string.
32 x 49 x 48 cm

TPCEN

They say what they can, 2015,
Glass from a window facing north, Avene soap-free cleansing gel,
18.3 x 75.3 x 31.7 cm

TPCEN

They say it’s like a rock, 2015,
Glass from a window facing south, Nag Champa incensé,
21 x 29 x 24 cm

TPCEN

A photo of a man crossing the street, 2015
Oil on linen, aluminum sliders, men’s shirt and man wearing it occasionally.
Canvas dimensions: 50 x 40 x 3.1 cm

TPCEN
TPCEN

Fade in / Fade out, 2014,
Approximations of scale using old photographs
Bronze poured into sand.

TPCEN

Holy drunk (this country, this people, this government), 2015
Bronce mixed with beer cans.

TPCEN

O, 2014
Volcanic rock, blue cosmetic contact lens, glass
25 x 36 x 9 cm

TPCEN

We focus on a woman facing sideways, 2014
Bronze, borrowed earing
91. 2 x 46 cm

TPCEN
TPCEN

Chasing, pausing, waiting, 2014,
Makeup (blush), bird droppings, cigarette ash, black marble
14.5 x 28 x 13 cm

TPCEN

Things in pause. Call forwarding, 2013,
Porcelain, Sim card. 32 x 32 x 2 cm

TPCEN

Person A / Person B, 2014
Ceramic, SIM cards
45.1 x 38.4 x 3.9 cm
59 x 42.1 x 6 cm

TPCEN

Description of
a slow motion scene (anticlockwise)
, 2014
Slowed down ceiling fan, disco ball motor, gilded necklace
127 cm.

TPCEN

Something separated by commas,, 2014
Marble, green contact lens, red lipstick
1.9 x 163.5 x 11 cm

TPCEN

Something separated by commas,, 2014
Marble, green contact lens, red lipstick (Detail)
1.9 x 163.5 x 11 cm

TPCEN

Dropped things are bound to sink,
2013-2015
Man flexing his biceps to show
off his strength,
Forma impresión.

TPCEN

Los Angeles, USA, 1976
Works and lives in Guadalajara, Mexico

Bio

Eduardo Sarabia was educated at the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles.
Eduardo Sarabia’s work takes its starting point in the history of Mexican society, investigating Pre-hispanic myths and their influence on current Mexican culture as well as topics of interest in the current political reality of the country – such as conflicts related to the drug war and class inequality. Characteristic of his work is a variety of aesthetic and symbolic components from both ancient and contemporary Mexican culture. Sarabia’s work does not, though, reflect the moral state of modern Mexico, but rather seeks to reveal a reality that goes beyond the values promulgated by the system.

Eduardo Sarabia

Painted Memories 4, 2012
Oil on canvas
142 x 199 cm


Tokyo Daze 2, 2012
Oil on canvas
142 x 199 cm

Eduardo Sarabia

Codex: Moctezuma’s Revenge, 2011
Acrylic, Chinese ink on paper
56 x 76 cm

Eduardo Sarabia

Snake Skin Boots with Snake Skin Head. White Quarry Stone, 21st Century, Northern Mexico, 2011
2.50 x .90 x 1.80 m
Installation at Collins Park, Art Public in Art Basel Miami Beach, 2011

Eduardo Sarabia
Eduardo Sarabia

Salon Aleman, 2008,
Installation, bar
Whitney Biennial, Park Armory

Eduardo Sarabia

History of the World, 2008
Hand painted ceramic plates
Installation view at L.A. Louver, Venice, CA.

Eduardo Sarabia

Painted Memories 3, 2010
Oil on canvas
142 x 199 cm

Tetris King and Queen of the Monarch Butterflies, 2007
Oil on canvas
199 x 142 cm

Eduardo Sarabia
Eduardo Sarabia



Julia Rometti, 1975, Francia
Victor Costales, 1974, Belarus
Viven y trabajan en la Ciudad de México